Cop27: summit to be extended to Saturday as talks remain gridlocked – live | Cop27

Climate summit to be extended an extra day

AFP is now reporting that the gridlocked UN climate talks will head into overtime. UN climate talks have been extended by a day in an effort to break deadlock as nations tussle over funding for developing countries battered by weather disasters and ambition on curbing global warming.

Wealthy and developing nations were struggling to find common ground on creating the fund, and on a host of other crucial issues, with only hours before the summit was scheduled to end in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh.

Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry, who chairs the COP27 talks, told delegates that the negotiations would spill into Saturday, a delay not unusual in such sprawling UN climate talks. “I remain concerned at the number of outstanding issues,” he said.

Key events

Ten year old activist asks delegates to ‘have a heart’

Nakeeyat Dramani, a 10-year-old Ghanaian climate activist, spoke passionately to the delegates assembled at Cop27 today, appealing to them to ‘have a heart’.

‘Have a heart’: 10-year-old Ghanaian climate activist receives standing ovation at Cop27 – video

Dramani spoke ‘on behalf of young people’ in fear over their future, who see the impact of the climate crisis every day, in the form of air pollution, flooding and droughts. She joined Ghana’s delegation to add her voice to the pressing consequences of the climate emergency in her country.

At the end of her speech, Dramani recited a poem, telling leaders to step up their game in fighting the climate crisis, and then held up a sign reading ‘Payment overdue’, in reference to the funds that have been long promised by developed countries.

Climate summit to be extended an extra day

AFP is now reporting that the gridlocked UN climate talks will head into overtime. UN climate talks have been extended by a day in an effort to break deadlock as nations tussle over funding for developing countries battered by weather disasters and ambition on curbing global warming.

Wealthy and developing nations were struggling to find common ground on creating the fund, and on a host of other crucial issues, with only hours before the summit was scheduled to end in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh.

Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry, who chairs the COP27 talks, told delegates that the negotiations would spill into Saturday, a delay not unusual in such sprawling UN climate talks. “I remain concerned at the number of outstanding issues,” he said.

Damian Carrington

The idea of taxing fossil fuels, flying and shipping to provide climate funds has moved a little closer to reality with the European Union’s proposal on loss and damage, which is the money demanded by poorer, vulnerable nations to rebuild after unavoidable climate disasters.

The EU proposal says: “We should work with the UN Secretary General to dig into solutions for innovative sources of finance – including levies on aviation, shipping and fossil fuels.”

The UNSG, António Guterres, said in September: “Polluters must pay. I am calling on all developed economies to tax the windfall profits of fossil fuel companies.”

On Tuesday, dozens of media organisations from around the world, including the Guardian, published a joint editorial article calling for a windfall tax on the biggest fossil fuel companies.

The global oil and gas industry has banked $1 trillion a year in pure profit for the last 50 years, and will probably be double that in 2022 as prices soared due to Russia’s war in Ukraine.

This might be a good moment to take in the wisdom of our colleague Fiona Harvey. Over the last year she headed out with a film crew to speak to Alok Sharma and Patricia Espinosa among others to try to pin down whose job it is to tackle climate change.

As Espinosa tells her: “It’s not looking good for humanity”.

But Harvey – who describes her job as ‘reporting on the end of the world’ – finishes on a note on optimism and hope for a better, more liveable planet.

Climate carnage: whose job is it to save the planet? – documentary

‘We feel silenced’ say activists who lost access after interrupting Biden

My colleague Nina Lakhani has reported on the four activists who very briefly interupted US president Joe Biden’s speech, and subsequently had their Cop27 revoked.

Big Wind, Jacob Johns, Jamie Wefald, and Angela Zhong missed the second week of the climate conference after being suspended for standing up with a “People vs Fossil Fuels” banner during Biden’s speech last Friday. The Indigenous activists, Wind and Johns, gave a war cry to announce themselves and draw attention to the fossil fuels crisis before security officials confiscated the banner. The group then sat down and Biden continued.

After the brief interruption, they sat quietly through the remainder of the speech before being escorted out by UN security staff. John said: “The UN security said that our war call had put people’s lives in danger, and we were now deemed a security threat. Our badges were pulled and we had to leave.”

The activists feel they have been silenced. Jacob Johns told the Guardian: “This is a clear example of radical Indigenous people and youth being silenced, we’re muted when we try to express our frustration in these spaces. It shows the UN’s true colours.”

A UNFCCC spokesperson said no advocacy actions were allowed inside plenary and conference rooms and that the four were suspended for breaking the code of conduct. “A final decision on the suspension shall be made after further enquiry of the issue,” they said.

Away from the negotiations it’s just emerged that Luxembourg has also now left the Energy Charter Treaty. The UK, however, continues to stand firm.

#EnergyCharterTreaty
Le Luxembourg sort du Traité de la Charte de l’Energie (TCE). C’est ce qu’a décidé le Conseil de gouvernement aujourd’hui, sur ma proposition. (1/2)

— Claude Turmes (@ClaudeTurmes) November 18, 2022

Arthur Neslen revealed some of the systemic problems with this treaty earlier this week: if you haven’t read his investigation yet, it’s definitely worth a look.

Joe Lo of Climate Home has tweeted an interesting comment from presidency’s Wael Aboulmagd, Egypt’s special representative for Cop27, on how the negotiations are going. According to Aboulmagd, it’s normal for countries to object to draft agreements.

I don’t think we have much to worry about. I hope I’m not wrong … Nobody is supposed to be 100% comfortable.

“I don’t think we have much to worry about. I hope I’m not wrong”, says the #Cop27 presidency’s Wael Aboulmagd. Says it’s normal for countries to object to draft agreements. “Nobody is supposed to be 100% comfortable”

— Joe Lo (@joeloyo) November 18, 2022

A few images from the Sharm El-Sheikh venue. The discussions could theoretically wind up within the next few hours – or last another couple of days.

Delegates taking a few selfies.
Delegates taking a few selfies. Photograph: Sedat Suna/EPA
Attendees listen to a review of the state of discussions.
Attendees listen to a review of the state of discussions. Photograph: Nariman El-Mofty/AP
Water jugs being carried through the venue earlier today, but we’re hearing reports that fridges are emptying in some locations.
Water jugs being carried through the venue earlier today, but we’re hearing reports that fridges are emptying in some locations. Photograph: Peter Dejong/AP
Nakeeyat Sam Dramani, a young poet from Ghana, holds a placard after giving a speech about global warming.
Nakeeyat Sam Dramani, a young poet from Ghana, holds a placard after giving a speech about global warming. Photograph: Sedat Suna/EPA
Activists take part in a protest outside the centre.
Activists take part in a protest outside the centre. Photograph: Peter Dejong/AP

Hallo it’s Bibi van der Zee here, taking over from my colleague Patrick Greenfield. Please email me at [email protected] or message me @bibivanderzee (if twitter is still standing by the end of the day).

Negotiations are carrying on, and everyone is waiting to find out whether there will be some sort of agreement by the end of today or whether – much more likely – discussions will carry on tomorrow. If they do continue, we’ll be blogging here, so hope you’ll join us

Thanks for following along. I am about to hand over to my colleague Bibi van der Zee.

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